RealWear announces Microsoft Teams for headsets

RealWear Inc. announced that it is integrating Microsoft Teams for RealWear’s voice-controlled Android HMT-1 headsets. With Teams on RealWear headsets, industrial workers can use both hands for complex work procedures while remotely collaborating with subject matter experts wherever they are in the world.

“Voice-optimizing Microsoft Teams for our reality-first, digital second headset will deliver measurable ROI in-situ for industry, empowering all first line workers,” said Sanjay Jhawar, president of RealWear. “This integration addresses a common request from our customers to deliver Teams on HMT-1 headsets, enabling them to operate the Teams app and start a remote meeting with just their voice.”

Firstline workers often are required to work in dangerous environments where the use of both hands is critical for safety and effectiveness. These workers increasingly require access to a screen to gather information or to collaborate. With RealWear’s noise cancellation technology for voice commands combined with an adjustable micro-display screen running Android, RealWear’s HMT-1 is purpose-built for safe collaboration and knowledge transfer at the edge.

Two million manufacturing jobs are expected to go unfilled creating a major skills gap in the manufacturing sector according to a Deloitte study from 2017. Microsoft Teams for HMT-1 will reduce costly travel, and help workers manage issues in dangerous environments such as wind turbines and high-speed or hard-to-reach machines. According to Harvard Business Review, the firstline workforce make up more than 2 billion people around the world of which five percent are skilled industrial workers with high information needs.

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Joanna Yorke is the managing editor of the Vancouver Business Journal. She has worked in the journalism field since 2010 after graduating from the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University in Pullman. Yorke worked at The Reflector Newspaper in Battle Ground for six years and then worked at and helped start ClarkCountyToday.com.