City of Vancouver closes all facilities

The City of Vancouver closed all city facilities to the public as of March 17. The closures are planned to last through April 30 and include City Hall, Water Resources Education Center, Utility Customer Services, Firstenburg and Marshall recreation centers and the Luepke Center. The City is looking at changes to the Navigation Center for the homeless to reflect public health interest and still serve Vancouver’s vulnerable, unhoused population. Public use of community meetings rooms at Vancouver fire stations has also been suspended at this time. 

City Council meetings will continue to be held at City Hall twice a month, with teleconference options available. Information about public attendance at future meetings will be released later.

The decision to close city facilities comes after City Manager Eric Holmes issued a Declaration of Civil Emergency on Friday in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The City has activated its Emergency Operations Center to continue to coordinate resources and leadership will continue to meet daily to plan for providing essential services while ensuring the safety of the public and employees.

Many City employees will begin working remotely and essential services, including police, fire, EMS, water, sewer and transportation services, will continue.

The City is offering both online and phone options to access a variety of services during the closure of city buildings. Updates on the City’s response are available at www.cityofvancouver.us/coronavirus as well as the City’s social media channels. Information on canceled or postponed meetings and events can be found at www.cityofvancouver.us/calendar.

Comments

comments

Joanna Yorke is the managing editor of the Vancouver Business Journal. She has worked in the journalism field since 2010 after graduating from the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University in Pullman. Yorke worked at The Reflector Newspaper in Battle Ground for six years and then worked at and helped start ClarkCountyToday.com.