Vancouver Business Journal

Sun04202014

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Trust, Park Service fail to reach agreement on Pearson Air Museum

Trust, Park Service fail to reach agreement on Pearson Air Museum

Several months after having entered into formal mediation talks to discuss issue...

Riverview Community Bank celebrates regulatory decision

Riverview Community Bank celebrates regulatory decision

Officials at Riverview Community Bank are moving forward with confidence knowing...

Commercial development: Building for tomorrow

Commercial development: Building for tomorrow

If commercial developers feel like circus performers walking a tightrope, there ...

 Business Growth Award finalists announced

Business Growth Award finalists announced

14 businesses have been named finalists for the Vancouver Business Journal's 201...

Is Food Processing part of Port “Comprehensive Scheme”?

Is Food Processing part of Port “Comprehensive Scheme”?

The leaders of a Clark County food processing company will bring their efforts t...

Developers cautious but developing

Developers cautious but developing

Although the Great Recession is behind us, many businesses and individuals are s...

Design & Construction

Commercial development: Building for tomorrow

Commercial development: Building for tomorrow

If commercial developers feel like circus performers walking a tightrope, there is good reason.

Limited financing, escalating regulatory and raw material costs, and still-low property valuations make penciling out a project difficult. And yet, workforce trends and emerging technologies demand designs that look to the future.

Build to the budget

According to Ron Frederiksen, president of RSV Bui...

Innovation & Manufacturing

Southwest Washington keeps its focus on manufacturing

Southwest Washington keeps its focus on manufacturing

Southwest Washington boasts a number of regional factors that are beneficial to the local economy. Among them are access to clean water, affordable power and a skilled workforce. These factors have continued to drive the local manufacturing industry in 2014 – an industry that was one of the first to convincingly move forward out of the recession.

“Advanced manufacturing aligns with both our Orego...

News Briefs

CREDC seeks health care startups to participate in “Shark Tank”

The Columbia River Economic Development Council (CREDC) is accepting applications from startups related to the health care sector interested in participating in Clark County PubTalk’s annual business pitch competition on Tuesday, June 17.

Spotlight

Audio Fox: A sound solution

Audio Fox: A sound solution

Like a lot of small businesses, Vancouver-based Sound Product Solutions started with a problem. Several years into retirement, Rex Clark was experiencing hearing loss – and he wasn’t the only one affected by that change.

“We had some disagreements, me and my wife, about where the volume should be on the TV,” said Rex. He remembered similar struggles between his own parents, but the best solution ...

Employers head to school

Seattle Internet career service startup expands to the Vancouver/Portland area

What can a recent college graduate who can’t find a job do? Start a company finding jobs for other recent college graduates. At least, that’s what Jason Granlund and Griffith Owen did. The two University of Washington graduates founded CampusPoint Corp. in Seattle in 2002 and expanded the company into the Vancouver/Portland area this year.

Seattle Internet career service startup expands to the Vancouver/Portland area

What can a recent college graduate who can’t find a job do? Start a company finding jobs for other recent college graduates. At least, that’s what Jason Granlund and Griffith Owen did. The two University of Washington graduates founded CampusPoint Corp. in Seattle in 2002 and expanded the company into the Vancouver/Portland area this year.

CampusPoint works to place candidates that are still in school or recently graduated in internships, temporary and part- and full-time positions with local companies.

"We are what happens when you combine elements of an on-campus career center, an employment agency and a dot-com job board," said Granlund.

When developing the company, Granlund and Owen realized most companies were not making an effort to employ recent graduates, and the companies actively recruiting at college campuses were always the same from one career fair to the next. The two knew there were companies out there that weren’t taking the time and expense to recruit employees that could benefit from hiring CampusPoint’s target audience.

"The cost associated with going after candidates on college campuses is often prohibitive," said Granlund. "It involves building individual relationships with schools and attending career fairs."

Granlund said CampusPoint gives employers access to a specific group of job seekers they otherwise do not have direct access to.

Recent college graduates are willing to work for the least amount of money, have advanced technical skills and, in many cases, have professional experience, said Granlund.

CampusPoint has developed several products to serve its clients’ needs. Job seekers pay nothing; revenue is generated by fees paid by employers. Companies can utilize CampusPoint’s Job Board for less than $100 and make open positions available to thousands of registered users. Clients can choose a more interactive approach with position listing fees beginning at less than $300 and placement fees starting at $1000. Traditionally, staffing firms charge a percentage of the employee’s starting annual salary, ranging from 10 to 30 percent. A new hire making $30,000 could cost a company $3,000 to $9,000. CampusPoint assigns an account manager to work with each employer and then screens and interviews candidates.

The company’s TempTern service has proven to be its most successful. The service combines the elements of a temp agency with that of an internship program. It provides companies with temporary qualified workers and candidates with experience and a wage. CampusPoint again has created a unique fee-based system. Clients pay the cost of employing the candidate plus $3 to $4 above cost. Most temp agencies typically charge a percentage of the wage paid. Additionally, CampusPoint does not charge a conversion fee for temporary employees brought on full-time, which, said Granlund, has contributed to the number of temporary hires that have transitioned into permanent jobs – 90 percent.

Additionally, CampusPoint maintains a directory of local companies, which includes information such as hiring history, work hours and employee benefits.

CampusPoint focuses mainly on small and mid-sized business, who are least likely to have recruiters visiting college campuses, said Granlund.

"Those are the kinds of employers we are trying to open up to our candidate pool, and, conversely, give our candidates access to those kinds of employers, which can be great for them," he said.

CampusPoint works on hiring for between 50 and 60 positions at any given time in the Vancouver/Portland area. Since entering the market in March, the company has registered 2,500 candidates, posted information on 500 employers and filled more than 100 positions.

The Vancouver office of Friedman Corp. is one of CampusPoint’s early local clients. The Deerfield, Ill.-based developer of software used in manufacturing employs nine people at its Vancouver dealer solutions division. Friedman Product Manager Alan Russell said the company has utilized employment and temp service agencies in the past. Russell was introduced to CampusPoint and decided to give it a try, as he was having difficulty finding a qualified candidate through other services. Friedman hired one CampusPoint candidate and is working on bringing on another.

"So far the results have been good," said Russell. "The response has been quick, and (CampusPoint) has provided me a steady list of candidates to choose from."

The company does not partner directly with colleges and universities but aims to attract students from area schools, including Clark College and Washington State University Vancouver.

"They know that the employers we primarily reach out to are ones that are not on their campuses," said Granlund. "And we are able to bring more and different opportunities to their students and graduates."

CampusPoint hires "student ambassadors" to help spread the word.

Given its proximity to Seattle and that Owens was raised in Portland and attended Oregon State University, the area presented the best opportunity for expansion. The company occupies a 3,300-square-foot office in Portland where it has five employees. Overall, the company has 17 employees. CampusPoint became profitable after a little more than a year, and Granlund projects the company will have revenue of more than $5 million this year, double the previous year. And by early 2007 the company expects to be in three new markets, likely in the Midwest.

Opinion

Focus Column

Innovating innovation

Innovating innovation

If you want to attract innovation, you need to be innovative. The Clark County Economic Development plan, which guides t...

You can thrive without reinventing the wheel

You can thrive without reinventing the wheel

Every day the media bombards us with headlines of doomsday for American manufacturers. We read how competition is stiff,...

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