Vancouver Business Journal

Fri10242014

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WSU Vancouver: Enhancing the business community for 25 years

WSU Vancouver: Enhancing the business community for 25 years

25 years ago, Washington State University opened its Vancouver branch on the Cla...

Maruichi Northwest to invest $30 million in port steel mill

Maruichi Northwest to invest $30 million in port steel mill

A new steel mill is coming to the Port of Vancouver USA’s Centennial Industrial ...

Tidland Corporate Center sold for $3.3 million

Tidland Corporate Center sold for $3.3 million

Tidland Corporate Center, a 64,000-square-foot industrial building and 6.03-acre...

Introducing the Accomplished & Under 40 Class of 2014

Introducing the Accomplished & Under 40 Class of 2014

The Vancouver Business Journal is pleased to announce the Accomplished and Under...

East county bridge proposal causes contention within freight industry

East county bridge proposal causes contention within freight industry

After $200 million taxpayer dollars were spent on the botched Columbia River Cro...

Angels bringing ideas to light

Angels bringing ideas to light

Most new businesses come to being with a great idea. How to get that great idea ...

Education & Workforce Development

WSU Vancouver: Enhancing the business community for 25 years

WSU Vancouver: Enhancing the business community for 25 years

25 years ago, Washington State University opened its Vancouver branch on the Clark College campus. From the very beginning, the university has been closely tied to Clark County’s business community, and those partnerships have grown even stronger over the last quarter-century.

WSU-Vancouver Chancellor Emile “Mel” Netzhammer joined the campus in July 2012, and has glowing praise for the relationsh...

Food & Agriculture

County, wine industry approaching smoother waters

County, wine industry approaching smoother waters

A learning experience. That is how both vineyard/winery owners and county officials seem to view the past few years, as they sought solutions that would encourage the development of wineries in the county while mitigating impacts to neighboring parcels. And, like many learning experiences, it was sometimes fraught with mistakes, misunderstandings and frustration. But Marty Snell, Clark County comm...

News Briefs

SWWDC and partners receive grant to train long-term unemployed individuals and veterans

The Southwest Washington/Portland Metro Area will receive nearly $8.5 million in grant funds to train 850 long-term unemployed individuals and 150 veterans for jobs in manufacturing and information technology.

Spotlight

ExecuTech Lease Group: Putting the personal touch into equipment leasing

ExecuTech Lease Group: Putting the personal touch into equipment leasing

Many restaurants and small businesses use a cash register and a separate terminal to handle sales, while another PC handles timecards and inventory management. But as the business grows, so does the need for a full-scale point of sale (POS) system. Such a system in a restaurant, for example, integrates everything from placing an order to a credit card swipe into one piece of equipment. But this ty...

From Holland to Vancouver: One intern’s experience

Paul OomMy name is Paul Ooms and I’m a journalism student from The Netherlands. For the last two months, I have been working as an editorial intern at the Vancouver Business Journal. Even though the Pacific Northwest is beautiful, it’s not the most logical place for a Dutch student to intern. However, I have a very special reason for choosing Southwest Washington. Next year, I will marry a rather wonderful girl, who happens to live in Battle Ground. This means that after graduating from school, I will live and work over here.

The last two months at the VBJ have given me new insight in the working environment of my new home country. In this column I write about the expectations I had before I came, and how things turned out even better than I had originally thought.

After sending out resumes to a few different local newspapers that I found through Google, the Vancouver Business Journal was the first to get back to me. This was a little scary for me, because “business journal” sounds very intimidating to someone who never liked the economics classes in college. But, desperate as I was, I was willing to go anywhere that would be close to my fiancée.

There were a few things I was a little anxious about. First, I had no idea what kind of people I’d get to work with. I didn’t know anything about this newspaper and thought the people working at such a publication must talk about taxes, unemployment and recession all day. Turns out, they were actually quite nice and pleasant co-workers.

Another thing I was afraid of was the business environment that I’d be working in – business people in particular. In my mind, to be a successful businessman, you have to give up being nice. Fortunately, I was wrong again. The business people I met were all great people that were very nice to me. At one point, John, Nick and I were invited to attend a business meeting inside a bar. For a 20-year-old intern, this wasn’t the best place to meet because I wasn’t allowed in. Instead of having me sit on the sidewalk outside, they moved the meeting to an alcohol-free space inside an office building across the street.

Finally, I thought a business journal could only report on boring stories. I’ll admit, some things went over my head, but there were many fascinating stories that I got to work on. The proposed plans for the baseball stadium, retail spotlights on great local businesses, a charming little community theatre and a film set in downtown Vancouver were among the interesting topics I came in touch with.

When I look back on the last two months, I think I have learned a lot. My expectations were exceeded and I had a great time. I’m glad the VBJ welcomed me and introduced me to my future field of work and the community that I will live in.

Oh, and the best part: I never had to get anyone a cup of coffee.

Opinion

Focus Column

Local restaurants master recipe for good health

Local restaurants master recipe for good health

Six local restaurants are discovering that good health is good business.

Dragonfly Café, Farrar’s Bistro, Mighty Bowl, ...

Revival of cooperatives

Revival of cooperatives

Agricultural cooperatives are a quiet but massive force in our national economy, producing nearly $4 billion annually an...

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