Vancouver Business Journal

Thu07312014

Last update09:37:00 AM

Font Size

Cpanel
More businesses helped by WSU Vancouver program

More businesses helped by WSU Vancouver program

Since 2011, more than 100 small businesses in the Vancouver area have received c...

Workforce Development: A return to personnel investment

Workforce Development: A return to personnel investment

It is a common reaction to economic downturn: companies understandably tighten t...

Aerospace grant to fuel expansion of Clark College

Aerospace grant to fuel expansion of Clark College

Clark College is growing its presence in the Columbia River Gorge thanks to a st...

Local alliance ready to shape state health care reforms

Local alliance ready to shape state health care reforms

Backed by local industry leaders, members of the Southwest Washington Regional H...

Self-taught filmmakers driving local industry

Self-taught filmmakers driving local industry

Ask a local about the film scene in Southwest Washington, and you’re likely to b...

Legal marijuana sales underway in Washington state

Legal marijuana sales underway in Washington state

A year and a half after voters legalized recreational marijuana in Washington st...

Banking & Money Management

Challenges & successes in local lending

Challenges & successes in local lending

Reaching the two-year mark is a milestone for small businesses. Not only can owners celebrate the survival of their life’s work, but doors to one of the most vital resources – capital – also begin to open up.

G6 Airpark in Vancouver recently reached this milestone. The local business is a trampoline park, a place where children and adults alike can play on wall-to-wall trampolines. But for owner ...

Education & Workforce Development

Workforce Development: A return to personnel investment

Workforce Development: A return to personnel investment

It is a common reaction to economic downturn: companies understandably tighten their budgets; non-essential or slow-to-return investments get nixed pretty quickly. During the Great Recession, this was the case not only in Southwest Washington, but throughout much of the nation, as investing in a company’s most valuable asset – their employees – fell victim to the reigning in of purse strings.

Wit...

News Briefs

Village Vineyard owner Julie Kuni headlines August 6 Boardroom Breakfast

Village Vineyard owner Julie Kuni headlines August 6 Boardroom Breakfast

What does it take to transform an old home and plot of land into a majestic bed & breakfast and organic winery? Julie Kuni, former retail executive (working with companies like The Discovery Channel and adidas) and long-time community volunteer, knows the answer.

Kuni is the owner of Village Vineyard, Clark County’s newest winery. Join us on Wednesday, August 6, for our latest Boardroom Break...

Spotlight

Wacom eyes continued growth of product lines

Wacom eyes continued growth of product lines

As Doug Little is being interviewed, he motions to the ball-point pen taking notes in my hand.

“You’re using a pen [and paper] right now, but you could be doing that with our tablet,” he said. Little is the senior public relations manager for Wacom Technology Services, a Tokyo-based company whose headquarters for the Americas are located in Vancouver.

Wacom specializes in creating a more intuiti...

Three marketing lessons from Realtors

Basic tips from real estate agents can help sell any product or service

Veronika Noize
Guest columnist

Any real estate professional can tell you the three most important factors in determining the value of real estate are location, location and location.
Any successful real estate professional will tell you the three most important factors in determining the success of a real estate professional are relationships, relationships and relationships.

Basic tips from real estate agents can help sell any product or service

Veronika Noize
Guest columnist

Any real estate professional can tell you the three most important factors in determining the value of real estate are location, location and location.
Any successful real estate professional will tell you the three most important factors in determining the success of a real estate professional are relationships, relationships and relationships.

My mother was a very successful real estate professional, as well as one of my most influential marketing role models and mentors. She was an anomaly in the business world in her day: a woman who went from a job as a bank teller to a seven-figure income as a real estate broker in just a few years.
The lessons she taught me have given me an edge in business, and although every lesson comes from the real estate industry, each has served me well in my business.

Lesson 1: Pictures help establish a relationship. In our very visually oriented culture, people respond first to pictures, and then to words, so the more you show the less you have to tell and sell.
My mother used photos in her classified ads for the houses she sold, a picture of herself on her business card, and pictures of happy families in their new homes along with their letters of thanks in her book of client successes.
These days realtors put all those photos on their Web sites, and that’s a lesson all businesses can use. Show photos of your work, your satisfied clients, and yourself on your Web site. This helps prospects see the results you offer, and it begins the relationship even before you actually meet.

Lesson 2: The relationship starts before you even meet your prospects, so make sure it’s a good beginning.
In a perfect world, all prospects would come to us through referrals, so they would already have some trust and confidence in us, but that’s not always possible.
Your relationship with your prospects (your future clients) starts the moment they become aware of you. That means your Web site, your ads, and even your reputation will often precede you, giving your prospects some idea of what to expect (or not) from you. So if you make promises you can’t keep in your advertising, or your Web site is full of errors and outdated information, you could be starting that relationship on shaky ground.

Lesson 3: Treat everyone who shows up as a prospect – even those who are “just looking” or looking on behalf of someone else.
Since it can be difficult to determine exactly who is a prospect sometimes, it is important to treat every inquiry with the respect and courtesy you would offer your best clients. Just because someone is not a prospect today doesn’t mean he won’t be tomorrow. And although she may be “just looking,” she could be looking for someone who is ready to buy, and relies on her recommendations for the short list of possibilities.

Veronika (Ronnie) Noize, the Marketing Coach, is the author of “How to Create a Killer Elevator Speech” and creator of the “How to Double Your Business in 30 Minutes a Day” marketing system. Ronnie’s Web site is a comprehensive resource with free articles and valuable marketing tools for small office/home office business professionals. Visit www.VeronikaNoize.com, or call her at 360-882-1298.

Opinion

Focus Column

Improve payment processes by making them more integrated

Improve payment processes by making them more integrated

You’ve probably heard the saying that there’s nothing good that cannot be improved on. In the changing world of payables...

Don’t let your business become a victim of bank fraud

Don’t let your business become a victim of bank fraud

Your bank or credit union is the lifeblood of your business and critical spoke in the wheel of daily commerce. To their ...

Special Editions

Business Growth Awards

Print Edition

JA Teline IV

Inside Track

JA Teline IV

Lists

Avatar

North Bank Magazine

JA Teline IV